Analysis of lennie in john steinbeck s

Due to his mild mental disability, Lennie completely depends upon George, his friend and traveling companion, for guidance and protection.

Analysis of lennie in john steinbeck s

Certified Educator This answer is interpretive and contains a speculative analysis about Lennie and his motivations. Lennie does not kill little animals accidentally. He tells George that he usually kills them because they struggle to get away and sometimes bite him.

Lennie is looking forward to tending rabbits for tworeasons. One is that he will have the pleasure of petting soft little animals. The other reason is that, since he is the one who tends the This answer is interpretive and contains a speculative analysis about Lennie and his motivations.

Lennie is looking forward to tending rabbits for two reasons. The other reason is that, since he is the one who tends the rabbits, he will be the one who kills them when they are fat enough to eat.

SparkNotes: Of Mice and Men: Lennie

In other words, he gets pleasure from petting little animals, and he also gets pleasure from killing them. This pleasure he derives from petting and killing animals is symptomatic of a violence which Lennie does not understand and which George does not suspect until he sees the dead body of Curley's young wife in the barn.

He put his hand over her heart. And finally, when he stood up, slowly and stiffly, his face was as hard and tight as wood, and his eyes were hard. George is beginning to feel guilty of the girl's death because he brought Lennie to this ranch, because he protected him from the mob in Weed, and because he "should have knew" that Lennie was becoming dangerous.

Lennie can't be blamed for being what he is, but that doesn't change what he has become.

Of Mice and Men Thesis Statements and Important Quotes

George "should have knew" that Lennie's violence couldn't be controlled. Perhaps Lennie was not interested in feeling the girl's soft dress, but he was sexually attracted to the girl herself.

When she got the idea that he was trying to rape her, it might be she wasn't far from the truth--although Lennie himself probably didn't understand his own urges. George assumes that something similar happened with Curley's wife in the barn.

Lennie didn't know what he was doing. Lennie is becoming a monster because he can't control his desires and his enormous physical strength.Loneliness and Lenny in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men - The Great Depression was a period in the ’s when America was in a state of economic collapse.

Character List

How do you feel when you're given an essay to write? Do you fill with f-f-fear?

Analysis of lennie in john steinbeck s

W-w-wobble with worry? P-p-pour with perspiration? Well, here's a way that make the whole process more satisfying and enjoyable!

Poetry. Adams, Kate, Bright Boat, 69; Adamshick, Carl, Everything That Happens Can Be Called Aging, 91; Adamshick, Carl, Tender, 91; Adamson, Christopher, J. Lennie.

SparkNotes: Of Mice and Men: Lennie

Although Lennie is among the principal characters in Of Mice and Men, he is perhaps the least dynamic. He undergoes no significant changes, development, or growth throughout the story and remains exactly as the reader encounters him in the opening pages.

John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a parable about what it means to be human. Steinbeck's story of George and Lennie's ambition of owning their own ranch, and the obstacles that stand in the way of that ambition, reveal the nature of dreams, dignity, loneliness, and sacrifice.

Analysis of lennie in john steinbeck s

Ultimately, Lennie, the mentally handicapped giant who makes George's dream of owning his own ranch worthwhile. Of Mice and Men - Kindle edition by John Steinbeck, Susan Shillinglaw. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

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